Embracing Winter

 

“In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer.
And that makes me happy. For it says that no matter how hard the world pushes against me, within me, there’s something stronger – something better, pushing right back.” Albert Camus

I’ve had a disdain for winter for as long as I can remember. When I was a child in Iowa, my older sister could get me to go outside only by explaining an exciting game we were going to play in the blistering cold. Her games usually involved making food – pizzas in the ground, snow cones in my hands, or building something else completely impossible. But every time, just as soon as the negative temperatures grazed my face, my imagination would halt and lay dormant against the frigid ground. I’d quickly become frustrated, irritated, and just wanted to go inside where it was safe and warm.

Recently, I found myself in an emotional and literal winter. While home visiting family and friends in the midwest, I was simultaneously drudging through my own difficult emotions as the first snowfalls arrived. One day, while shoveling the snow with a friend, I managed to conjure up a few words alongside my sarcastic smile, “thank you for teaching me to love winter again”. These synchronized encounters of winter have challenged me to consider winter as something I could learn to love, even if only because it’s here.

I’ve tried, like so many of us have, to enjoy my winter. To let it be and behold it for the miracle that it is. To cherish the snow falling as if I’m getting to see a snow globe live; to move through my emotional pain and accept it just as I am. This has proven much more difficult than I ever imagined. It’s much easier to despise the winter or suffer through it knowing spring is imminent, but what if it’s not? What if this is the winter that spring never enters into? What if these are the sorrows that never go away?

Though contrasting seasons can assist us in embracing the one that is present, what if a contrast never comes again? I so often hear and tell myself to live here and now – that the day before me is all I have, and I wonder what it might look like if I truly lived like winter is all I had? What if I basked in the freezing temperatures and reveled in the thoughts of snow? What would it feel like to constantly be okay with a flow of tears and an openly aching heart? Loving winter requires a vulnerability I’m still unfamiliar with.

It is certain that in my figurative winter, I’ve been opened up in a way I never knew possible. The rawness of my spirit has forced in a light often too bright to stand — but in my openness, it keeps shining in. Though this can be a painful experience and usually makes me want to dive deeply into hibernation, I’m managing to stay outside longer. I’m learning to be with the light of day. As it always is, getting in touch with my own soreness has made me more aware of those in pain around me. I find myself all the more often sitting side-by-side with those in need as we watch the snow fall together. Then, in our togetherness we become ready to shovel our neighbors out and play as best we can in the hideous bone-chilling cold.

For one of the first times in my life, I’m listening to the exciting games of winter and joining in their fun, doing my best to forget the pain of the wind against my face, doing my best to be here, now. Sometimes, or usually, my laughter is in vain, and my cheer is fake – but I’m still going outside and doing my best.

At the end of the day I know winter is a sure sign of spring, but it is still worthy of my imperfect effort to enjoy – especially knowing there are so many already out there scooping the sidewalks of strangers, just so we can all play.

“The winters will drive you crazy until you learn to get out into them.” Parker J. Palmer

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Ames, Iowa (Photo by Cassidy Hall)
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2 thoughts on “Embracing Winter

  1. An interesting take on winter! I am attempting to be mindful of the way I tense up and hunch my shoulders against the cold. What happens if I just relax them? A college friend of mine just wrote a book called “What Doesn’t Kill Us” – and addresses how we as human beings were MEANT to experience extreme cold, extreme altitude, and how embracing those things makes us healthier and more capable. Looking forward to learning more about that. At the same time, you know I’m fascinated by the Danish concept of “hygge” — and especially in the way Scandinavian folks cultivate a cozy, warm way to connect INSIDE during the dark winter months. Linky for book: https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_1_26?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=what+doesn%27t+kill+us+scott+carney&sprefix=what+doesn%27t+kill+us+scott%2Cstripbooks%2C193&crid=1Y0MV15UGXQ3F

  2. Cassidy–so good to read another moving piece of yours! I don’t know if you had Mr. Forsman or Mrs. Campbell while at Ames High, but your writing would make them extremely proud. Mr. Forsman always talked about the green and gold and his “golden ideas”. I, too, am not a winter fan. Honestly, I think it gets worse the older you get, but today I am moved by your writing and will do my best to embrace winter (with my warm coat, fuzzy hat, scarf, and mittens! Keep on writing girl! You are awesome!!

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